The inhabitants of Earth are mostly microbes, and their activities are central to human welfare. Microbes can cause disease, but a properly functioning microbiome is essential for health. Microbes spoil food, but drive many forms of food production. Microbes mediate organismic decay, but catalyze numerous geochemical processes essential for life on Earth.

Research in the Penn Microbiology Department focuses on infectious agents that threaten global health, with an emphasis on understanding molecular mechanisms and developing key new methods. Areas of focus include pathogenic bacteria of the airway and gut, HIV/AIDS, insect- and rodent-borne viruses, herpes viruses, papillomaviruses, emerging infectious diseases and the human microbiome. On the host side, faculty study many areas of immunology related to infection, including innate and adaptive immunity, tumor immunology and vaccine development.


Nice coverage of @seth_zost @pnasnews paper:

Congrats to Haim Bau, awarded "Biomedical Device of the Year" @PennPCI ! https://t.co/2uD1UYtFlh

Hear a discussion about this year’s flu season and flu vaccines with @SCOTTeHENSLEY on the Wharton School’s @whartonknows on SiriusXM Business Radio! https://t.co/8y5F4rCCq5

Universal Flu Vaccine? @SCOTTeHENSLEY , an assoc. professor @pennmicro, commented in light of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases releasing a strategic plan for developing a universal flu vaccine. https://t.co/ruVhzbOxBZ

Congrats to Prof Yvonne Paterson, named Inventor of the Year @PennPCI ! She counts among her achievements the development & testing of a cancer vaccine using bacterium L. monocytogenes, which can cause food poisoning & other illnesses, to fight tumors. https://t.co/4DP87LYQIR

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Virology Seminar
Tuesday, March 20th, 12pm, 209 Johnson Pavilion

Rianne Esquivel (Weiner Lab)
“An optimized DNA encoded monoclonal antibody (DMAb) prevents Zika virus infection and severe testicular atrophy in mice.”
Emmanuelle Genoyer (Lopez Lab)

Microbiology Seminar
Wednesday, March 21st, 12pm, CRB Auditorium

Michael Starnbach, PhD
Department of Microbiology/Immunobiology, Harvard University
“Chlamidia trachomatis infection: A strategy of stealth”

Prokaryotic Seminar
Friday, March 23rd, 12pm, 209 Johnson Pavilion
Vincent Tam, PhD
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Temple University School of Medicine
“Restoring the Balance: Resolution of Inflammation during Influenza/ Staphylococcus aureus super-infection”